Guardian article

Yesterday I wrote a piece on the history of employment legislation, for the Guardian’s Comment is Free section.  You can  find the article here. The Guardian didn’t include images of the objects I mentioned so I’ve posted them below.

The banner is the Sunderland Employers. It was produced in 1871 to celebrate a national agreement for a nine hour day between engineering unions and employers . As you can see the front of the banner shows a employee and employer holding the charter. The ship in the background were symbolic of the employment of engineers in Sunderland’s many shipyards. The back of the banner includes the words ‘The Pioneers of the Nine Hour Movement’

You can see the real thing on the second floor gallery of the People's History Museum

You can see the real thing on the second floor gallery of the People’s History Museum

The other object I mentioned in the article was a watch produced by the International Workingmen’s Association. It’s one of 12 pocket watches produced by the organisation as part of a campaign for the eight hour day. The back of the watch shows two workers in a fraternal handshake. Around the front of the face was the demand, “We require eight hours of work. Eight hours for instruction and eight hours for repose.”

People's History Museum

People’s History Museum

People's History Museum

People’s History Museum

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